Higher-resolution K = 11 analysis of the European admixture in Chinchorro DNA

Below is a plot for a higher-resolution K = 11 admixture analysis that includes a Chinchorro mummy sample from Chile dated to 3972–3806 BC. This analysis uses a much larger number of transversion SNPs for all samples than my earlier admixture analyses. While most of my admixture analyses have used 1,067 transversion SNPs for the Chinchorro sample, and my previous high-resolution admixture analyses used 2,055 transversion SNPs for the sample, this analysis uses 26,982 transversion SNPs for the sample.

Here are the new admixture percentages for the Chinchorro sample:

      0.00%
      0.00%
      21.77%
      14.18%
      1.15%
      0.00%
      0.00%
      0.00%
      0.00%
      58.51%
      4.38%

The sum of the non-Amerindian component percentages in this analysis is 41.49%, which is consistent with the K = 8, 9, and 10 analyses.

The Chinchorro sample has 1.536 times more of the plain blue component than the light blue component, unlike the Spanish admixture in Mestizos, where there’s significantly more of the light blue component than the plain blue component.

The trace amount of the pine green component in the Chinchorro sample is inconsistent with modern contamination, as all modern Europeans have a significant amount of this component.

The presence of the purple component in the Chinchorro sample is also inconsistent with modern contamination.

If one ignores the absence of the plain green component in the Chinchorro sample, then pre-LGM Europeans remain one possible source of its European admixture.

If one ignores the presence of the purple component in the Chinchorro sample, then European hunter-gatherers with some early European farmer admixture could be another possible source of its European admixture.

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6 comments on “Higher-resolution K = 11 analysis of the European admixture in Chinchorro DNA
  1. pepe did nothing wrong says:

    Dude, what do you think about this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1k_b-jmz3k
    It’s about Paracas elongated skulls DNA tests. Apparently, best match is north Caucasus / Black sea region. Would that somehow fit into Chinchorro results?

  2. Genetiker says:

    I think that it’s quite possible that Foerster is reporting the truth about the mtDNA of the Paracas people.

    I wish that people other than Foerster, who has associated himself with ancient alien nonsense, and L. A. Marzulli, who is associated with Jewish fairy tale nonsense, were having the DNA testing carried out and were reporting the results.

    But in this highly imperfect world of ours we have to take what we can get. I certainly don’t expect to ever get the truth about ancient Peruvian DNA from anti-White frauds like David Reich and Eske Willerslev.

    I also would like to see the scientific details of the DNA testing being made freely available on the Internet by the scientists who actually conducted that testing, at the Paleo-DNA Laboratory at Lakehead University in Canada, and at UCLA in California. I don’t want to have to pay money for the book and DVDs Marzulli is going to be selling to see the details of the testing. It must be noted, however, that the “scientific community” charges far more money for access to their papers.

    At 3:44 in this video Foerster discusses blood type testing of Paracas mummies. The results he refers to are from this 1976 paper, which can be accessed for free here. The results are from testing done on 14 Paracas mummies, not 10 as Foerster says. And I don’t know what he’s talking about when he says that the paper was “destroyed”, although it certainly seems that subsequent discussion of those results has been suppressed within the “scientific community”. Foerster is correct in saying that if the mummies were 100% South American Indian, then all of them should have belonged to blood group O. But only 43% of them did. The paper shows that mummies from other ancient Peruvian cultures, including the Nazca culture, also belonged to non-O blood groups. Another paper published in 1978 (freely accessible here) presented blood type results for more ancient Peruvian mummies, and it showed the same large presence of non-O blood groups.

    In the segment starting at 5:54 in this video (an episode of Ancient Aliens, unfortunately), tooth and bone powder are shown being extracted from another Paracas skull in a lab at New York University, and in the segment starting at 36:40 it’s reported that the mtDNA was found to be Caucasoid.

    All of these blood type and mtDNA results are of course consistent with the European physical features of ancient Peruvian remains, the European features of people depicted in ancient Peruvian artwork, and the European features of some of the Peruvian natives as described in the firsthand written accounts of the early Spanish conquistadors and chroniclers, all of which I have been at the forefront of documenting on my blog over the past five years.

    Apparently, best match is north Caucasus / Black sea region.

    The Caucasoid mtDNA haplogroups Foerster has said were found in Paracas remains are U2e1, T2b, H1, and H2a.

    U2e has been present at high frequencies in Eastern Europe since the Mesolithic, but it has also been found in Mesolithic samples from Germany and Sweden, and it has been found in samples from the Copper Age Corded Ware and Bell Beaker cultures in Germany, the Early Bronze Age Unetice culture in Germany, and in an Early Bronze Age sample from England.

    T2b has been present all over Europe since the Early Neolithic, and it has been found in Late Neolithic samples from Morocco.

    The highest frequencies of H1 are not found in the Ponto-Caspian and Caucasus regions as Foerster says, but in Southwestern Europe, and it’s been that way since the Neolithic. H1 has also been found in Guanche samples from the Canary Islands.

    H2a has been found in Early Copper Age samples from Eastern Europe, but it has also been found in samples from the Copper Age Remedello culture of Italy, the Copper Age Corded Ware and Bell Beaker cultures of Germany, the Early Bronze Age Unetice culture of Germany, and in a Bronze Age sample from Scotland. H2a has also been found in Guanche samples from the Canary Islands.

    So Foerster really has no basis for concluding that the mtDNA haplogroups he says were found in Paracas remains originated from the Ponto-Caspian or Caucasus regions. The haplogroups are more consistent with an origin in Western Europe, Northwest Africa, and the Canary Islands, from some time during or after the Copper Age.

    Would that somehow fit into Chinchorro results?

    No, I believe that the European DNA in the Chinchorro people and the European DNA in the people of the Paracas culture and other later Peruvian cultures is from two (or more) separate migrations to the Americas coming ultimately from Western Europe. The Chinchorro mummies are much older than other Peruvian and Chilean mummies, and they only have brown and chestnut hair, while the later mummies have, in addition to brown and chestnut hair, red and blond hair.

  3. vsva says:

    From Olalde study about Bell beakers study is not out, but BAM file are already here! https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/ERP105397

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