More Y-SNP calls for La Braña 2

Below are more Y-SNP calls for La Braña 2. Positive calls are in bold, and negative calls are in non-bold.

The La Braña 2 sample is from one of two skeletons found in the La Braña-Arintero cave in the province of León in northwestern Spain. The La Braña 2 skeleton was dated to 7960–7750 BP, which is about the same as the dating for the La Braña 1 skeleton at 7940–7690 BP. La Braña 2 was autosomally similar to La Braña 1.

The calls show that La Braña 2 belonged to Y haplogroup C1(xC1a1). La Braña 1 and La Braña 2 both belonged to mitochondrial haplogroup U5b2c1, and it’s safe to assume that La Braña 2 belonged to the same C1a2-V20 Y haplogroup that La Braña 1 did.

A0-T-YP2250
A0-T-YP1830
A0-T-YP1820
A0-Z9579/Y10043
A0-Z9555/Y10023
A0-Z8817/Y9631
A0-Z8877/Y9668
A0-Z9249/Y9831
A0-Z9513/V3837
A1a-V25
A1a-Z10343/Y8027
BT-V2209/M9028/PF298
CT-M5660
CT-M5741
D2a-Y12561
E1-P147/PF1938
E1b1b1-CTS2747/PF1641/M5139
E1b1b1-V68-M78-Z1919-L618-V13-Y16713-Y16724
E1b1b1-V68-M78-Z1919-L618-V13-Z5016-S26015-CTS6377
E1b1b1-Z827-L19-PF2332
E1b1b1-Z827-Z829-Z1259-FGC18685/Y5857
E1b1b1-Z827-Z829-M34-M84-Y14899-Y14899
E1b1a1a1-Y1623-M4706-L485-L514-M4694-M191-U174-M4670-Z874-CTS1360-CTS9987
C1-K30
C1-K33
C1a1-Z4036
C1b1a-K297
C1b1a-K70
C2e1a-F3739
C2b-Y11100-Y11990-Z30631/Y12027
G-L519/F1131
G-CTS2251/PF2941/M3289
G-PF2918
G2a-Y5797-Z6653-Z6634-Z7958-FGC749/Z7959
G2a2a-PF3177-Y14918-FGC6699
G2a2b2a1a-S22146-L1266-Z6390
G2a2b2a1-PF3345-CTS342-Z724-Z1903-Y248/Z3133
G2a2b2a1b-Z1819/CTS5762
G2a2b2a1b-Z1818/CTS6235
G2a2b2a1b-FGC470/Y7539
H3-Z13496
H3b1-Z13707
H1-Y2575
H1b2-Z14274
H1b2a-Z14331
H1a-Z4174/M2720
IJ-FGC1559/YSC0000056/PF3502
I1-Z2728
I1-DF29-Z2336-Z2337-L22-Y3549-CTS5350-CTS5350
I2-L596-S6669
I2-L460-P37-CTS595-L1287-L233-Y4239
I2-L460-P37-CTS595-L158-Z2049-Z2050/PF3999
I2-L460-P37-CTS595-L158-Z2049-Y11222-Y14718-Y14720-Y15467
I2-L460-P37-CTS595-L158-Z2049-L160-CTS814/PF4087
I2-L460-P37-CTS595-L158-Z2049-L160-Z105-PF4188-PF4223-PF4225
I2-L460-P37-M423-L621-V4164/CTS10494
I2-L460-M436-L38-FGC29568/Y13063
I2-L460-M436-M223-L34/S151/PF3857
I2-L460-M436-M223-Y6098-S10898
I2-L460-M436-M223-Y6098-SK1256/S23473
I2-L460-M436-M223-Y4450-CTS616-Y3721-Y3670-L1229-Z2069-Z2058-Z2068-Y7244-Y7541
I2-L460-M436-M223-Y4450-CTS616-Y3721-M284-L1195-L1193-Y3684-Y5996-Y6006
I2-L460-M436-M223-Y4450-CTS616-CTS10057-L701-L699-L704-Y7642-Y7641-Y8563
I2-L460-M436-M223-Y4450-CTS616-CTS10057-Z161-L801-CTS6433-CTS6433
I2-L460-M436-M223-Y4450-CTS616-CTS10057-Z161-L801-CTS6433-S2364-S8112-Y4926-Y13037-Y13439
J1-Y6304-ZS80/CTS3219
J1a-YSC0001294/CTS8948/PF4751
J1a-Z2217-Z1828-Z18370/Y3481
J1a2-P58-Z2346/PF4663
J2-PF4905
J2-M102-Z519
J2-M102-Z1825-M241-L283-Z600-Z597-Z638-Z1296-Z1297-Z631-Z632
J2-M410-PF4610-Z6046-Z6050-Z6050
J2-M410-PF4610-Z6046-Z6050-Y12709
J2-M410-PF4610-L26-PF5087-PF5160-PF5197-PF5172-PF5169-PF5171-PF5174-Z7308-Z6092-Z7356
J2-M410-PF4610-L26-PF5087-PF5160-L24-Z388/PF5274/F848
J2-M410-PF4610-L26-PF5087-PF5116-PF5119-L558-L558/PF7408
J2-M410-PF4610-L26-PF5087-PF5116-PF5119-L558-M67-Z7671-CTS900-CTS6804-Y3612-Y3620-Y7291-Y7292-Y7685-Y7799
J2-M410-PF4610-L26-PF5087-PF5116-PF5119-L558-M67-Z500-M92-Z8096-L556-FGC20424/Y9410
L-M317-Y16360
L-M2481-L1307-M2542
L-M2481-L1307-M2681
T-ZS80/CTS3219
T-L206-FGC1217/Y3861
T-L206-CTS2386
T-L206-M70-Y11151-Y8614-Y12871-Y14629-Y14637
N-Z4992
N1c1a1-Y9022-SK1505/Y9285
O1a1-Z23222/FGC15378/K640
O1a1-CTS52-CTS2332
O2b-F3817
O2-K18-CTS10887-CTS6359
O2a1-CTS10007-CTS3369
O2a1-M1310-CTS4769-CTS5854-CTS7399-SK1618/FGC19694/Y14256
O-M122-CTS1754-F2312
O-M122-M324-L465-CTS727-F915-Z24825/Y14558
O-M122-M324-L465-CTS727-CTS3709-F2640-F912
O-M122-M324-L465-IMS-JST002611-F18-F11-F270-F142
O3a2c1-Y20-Y12-CTS2643-F634-CTS11492
O3a2c1a-M1706-Z25795/FGC23461/Y9142
Q-L274-L275-Y1150-Y1204
Q-L274-L472-F1096-F746-YP1500-YP1483
Q-L274-L472-F1096-M25-L712-L715-YP826
Q-L274-L472-L56-Y2659-Z5902-Y6793-Y6802
Q-L274-L472-L56-Y2659-Z5902-Y6793-Y6853
Q-L274-L472-L56-L53-L54-L330-Y5237
Q-L274-L472-L56-L53-L54-M1107-Z780-Z781-L569-YP891
Q-L274-L472-L56-L53-L54-M1107-M930-L804-Y9048-Y9047-Y9296
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z93-YP1451-YP1451
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z93-Z94-Y40-YP294-Z96-CTS9094/S3603
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z93-Z94-Z2124-Z2125-Z2123-Y875-Y937
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z283-Z282-PF6155-M458-Y2604-L260-YP253-YP654-YP656
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z283-Z282-Y2395-YP3896-YP3901
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z283-Z282-Y2395-Z284-Z287-Y2400/S3239
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z283-Z282-Y2395-Z284-Z287-CTS8277-S6241-YP1257
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z283-Z282-Z280-S24902-YP561-YP564-Y14508
R1a-M459-M198-M417-Z645-Z283-Z282-Z280-CTS1211-Y35-CTS3402-YP237-YP582-YP578-Y10804-Y10804
R1b1c-FGC21015/V3608
R1b1c-FGC20970/Y8447
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-U106-Y15627-Y15790
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-U106-FGC3861-Z8053-Y2402-L217.1-FGC7913/Y11846
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-U106-S263-S499-L48-L47-L44-FGC6183/Y2733
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-P312-DF27-Y14529-FGC30997/Y14530
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-P312-DF27-Z225-Z222-Z233
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-P312-L21-DF63-CTS6919-A94
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-P312-L21-DF13-L371-FGC10063/Y14494
R1b1-L389-P297-M269-L23-L51-L151-P312-L21-DF13-DF21-Y2890-Z246-DF25-DF5-Y9367-L658-FGC5777/Y9361
R-Y482-M479-Y8763-Y8766-V3714-FGC18148/V3714

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Y-SNP calls for another Neolithic Hungarian genome

Here are the Y-SNP calls for NE7, a sample from the Neolithic Lengyel culture of Hungary, dated to 4490–4360 BC. NE7 was autosomally similar to the farmers of early and middle Neolithic Europe.

The Y-SNP calls for NE7 show that, like the Neolithic Hungarian sample KO1 from over a thousand years earlier, and like several of the hunter-gatherer samples from Mesolithic and Neolithic Sweden, he belonged to Y haplogroup pre-I2a1a2a1-L1287.

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More Y-SNP calls for an early Neolithic Hungarian genome

Here are more Y-SNP calls for KO1, a sample from the early Neolithic Körös culture of Hungary, dated to 5780–5650 BC. The autosomal analyses of KO1 showed that he was genetically similar to the Y haplogroup I hunter-gatherers of Mesolithic Europe, and that he had no admixture from the Southeastern Europeans who first introduced farming to Europe.

The Y-SNP calls for KO1 show that he belonged to Y haplogroup pre-I2a1a2a1-L1287. This is the same Y haplogroup that was found in one of the hunter-gatherer samples from Motala, Sweden dated to around 6000 BC, and also in three of the hunter-gatherer samples from the Pitted Ware culture in Sweden dated to around 2750 BC.

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Y-SNP calls for the Motala genomes

In the table below are links to Y-SNP calls for the five 8,000-year-old male Mesolithic hunter-gatherer genomes from the town of Motala in Östergötland, Sweden.

Motala 9 belonged to Y haplogroup pre-I2a1a2a1-L1287. The presence of I2a1a2a1-L1287 and I2a1b-M423 in both the Motala samples and in samples from the Pitted Ware culture shows that there was continuity in the Y chromosome lineages of Scandinavia over the 3,500-year time span from 6000 BC to 2500 BC.

Motala 2   I2c-L597        calls
Motala 3   I2a1b-M423      calls
Motala 6   I2a1-P37        calls
Motala 9   I2a1a2a1-L1287  calls
Motala 12  I2a1b-M423      calls
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More Y-SNP calls from Stone Age Sweden

In the table below are links to enlarged sets of Y-SNP calls for seven Stone Age Swedish genomes.

Note that some of the samples have negative calls for some of the SNPs defining the haplogroups listed in the table. If those calls are false negatives, then the samples belong to the listed haplogroups as they are defined today. But if any of those negative calls are true negatives, then the samples are on a branch of the Y tree leading to the listed haplogroups as they are now defined.

Stora Förvar 11, a Mesolithic hunter-gatherer who lived on the small Swedish island of Stora Karlsö 7,500 years ago, belonged to haplogroup I1 or pre-I1. This is the earliest occurrence of I1 or pre-I1 that has ever been found.

The Stora Förvar 11 finding makes it clear that anyone who concluded on the basis of the five Motala samples (which were I2) that I1 was absent in Mesolithic Scandinavia would have been foolish in doing so, especially in light of the fact that I1 is the predominant Y haplogroup in Scandinavia. And yet David Reich, David Anthony, Eske Willerslev, Greg Cochran, David “Davidski” Wesolowski, J. Maciamo Hay, and countless moronic blog and forum commenters have come to the same kind of foolish conclusion in deciding that R1b was absent in Mesolithic Western Europe, based on only two Mesolithic Western European samples.

The pattern that is beginning to emerge is that Y haplogroups were present during the Mesolithic in the same places where the highest frequencies of those haplogroups are found today. The 7,500-year-old hunter-gatherer sample from Karelia, Russia belonged to R1a-M459, and the highest frequencies of R1a-M459 are found today in Northeastern Europe. The 7,500-year-old hunter-gatherer sample from Samara, Russia belonged to pre-R1b-M478, and the highest frequencies of R1b-M478 in Europe today are found in Northeastern Europe. And now we have the 7,500-year-old Stora Förvar 11 sample that belonged to I1 or pre-I1, from the same area where the highest frequencies of I1 are found today.

This pattern is only natural, and it’s exactly what would have been expected by any objective and reasonably intelligent person. But the above-listed people expect everybody to share their idiotic belief that this pattern applies to every Y haplogroup on Earth except for R1b-M269, which according to their ludicrous account of things was confined by some mysterious force to Eastern Europe until 3000 BC, many thousands of years after it originated, at which time the bulk of it was transferred to Western Europe by some magical process that created a frequency gradient in the opposite direction of what it should have been. The reality, of course, is that R1b-M269 originated in Western Europe in the descendants of the western Gravettians during the Paleolithic, and the highest frequencies of R1b-M269 have been found in Western Europe ever since.

Mesolithic    5500 BC  Stora Förvar 11  I1-M253         calls
Funnelbeaker  3000 BC  Gökhem 4         I2a1b1-L161.1   calls
Pitted Ware   2750 BC  Ajvide 52        I2a1a2a1-L1287  calls
Pitted Ware   2750 BC  Ajvide 58        I2a1a2a1-L1287  calls
Pitted Ware   2750 BC  Ajvide 59        I-M170          calls
Pitted Ware   2750 BC  Ajvide 70        I2a1a2a1-L1287  calls
Pitted Ware   2500 BC  Ire 8            I2a1b1a1-S2703  calls
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I’m back!

For those who missed Andrii’s comment, I have been locked out of my Genetiker WordPress account for the past month, because of a bug in the way that WordPress processed passwords. After a month of correspondence with WordPress support, I have finally been able to regain access to my account.

A big thanks to Andrii for reproducing the bug, and to Melissa F.P. from WordPress support for sending me a password reset link.

While I was locked out of my Genetiker blog, I put new posts up on a temporary Genetiker2 blog. I have now recreated these new posts here. These posts show that the Chinchorro people had additional Caucasoid admixture, beyond what is found in all Amerindians, and that this admixture is from Western Europeans. The physical characteristics of the mummies of the Chinchorro culture and other ancient Peruvian and Chilean cultures already made it clear that the people of those cultures were at least partially European, but this is the first DNA evidence in history proving that Europeans were in the Americas before the Vikings. The European DNA in the Chinchorro sample also provides a window onto the genetic makeup of the people of Western Europe before 4000 BC, showing that at least some of them had a significant amount of admixture from Y haplogroup R people. This drives a huge nail into the coffin of the already dead Kurgan hypothesis, and provides further evidence for my theory, introduced early last year, that the Gravettians spread haplogroup R and Indo-European languages across the whole of Europe during the Paleolithic.

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K = 16 admixture analysis of ancient American genomes

Originally posted on August 3, 2015

At the bottom of this post is a plot for a K = 16 ADMIXTURE analysis that includes 14 ancient samples from the Americas. Above the plot are the admixture percentages for the ancient American samples.

The correspondences between the colors and the components are as follows:

      Bushman and Pygmy
      Western Negroid
      Eastern Negroid
      European hunter-gatherer Caucasoid
      Northern European Caucasoid
      Southern European Caucasoid
      Middle Eastern Caucasoid
      Veddoid-Caucasoid hybrid
      Taiwanese aborigine Mongoloid
      Southern Mongoloid
      Northern Mongoloid
      Itelmen and Koryak
      Eskimo
      Northern Amerindian
      Southern Amerindian
      Australoid

This analysis gives a breakdown of the additional Caucasoid admixture in the Chinchorro mummy sample identified by the K = 4 analysis.

The Chinchorro woman didn’t have any of the Middle Eastern component, so her additional Caucasoid admixture was clearly from Europeans and not Middle Easterners or North Africans. Note that the Middle Eastern component is present in the modern Amerindian samples that have additional Caucasoid admixture, because that admixture is primarily from the post-Columbian Spanish, and the post-Columbian Spanish show a significant amount of the Middle Eastern component.

She had 12.17% of the European hunter-gatherer component. Modern Europeans show almost none of this component, but it is present in significant amounts in all prehistoric European samples, except for Europe’s first farmers, most of whom lacked it. Her additional Caucasoid admixture is therefore consistent with the genetic makeup of the Europeans of her time, around 4000 BC.

She doesn’t show any of the Northern European component. Note that this component and the European hunter-gatherer component are closely related. I think that with a larger number of SNPs she would show both of these components, but that since the number of SNPs is limited all of this kind of admixture is ending up being assigned to the hunter-gatherer component.

She had 8.42% of the Southern European component. This component is completely absent in almost all available Mesolithic European genomes, but it makes up almost all of the genomes of Europe’s early and middle Neolithic farmers. Note that the Mesolithic Loschbour hunter-gatherer does show some of this component. While large amounts of this component certainly did spread throughout Europe during the early Neolithic, I think that it has been present in smaller amounts along the entire Mediterranean coast of Europe since the Mesolithic. It is therefore possible that the Chinchorro woman’s European ancestors came to South America as early as the Mesolithic.

She shows 15.32% of the Veddoid-Caucasoid hybrid component. This component does not appear in any Mesolithic or Neolithic European samples not belonging to Y haplogroup R. It appears in the Y haplogroup R Mal’ta 1 sample, in the closely related Afontova Gora 2 sample, in the R1b Pit Grave samples, and in the R1b Bell Beaker samples. The appearance of this component in the Chinchorro woman shows that haplogroup R was present along the Atlantic coast of Western Europe before 4000 BC, contrary to the idiotic belief of David Reich, David Anthony, Eske Willerslev, Greg Cochran, David “Davidski” Wesolowski, J. Maciamo Hay, and countless moronic blog and forum commenters that haplogroup R was magically confined to Eastern Europe until a thousand or more years later. The reason that all these people hold this idiotic belief is that they all have a mindless adherence to Marija Gimbutas’s Kurgan hypothesis, which has become a dogma in academia. Haplogroup R1b is associated with the centum Indo-European languages, and for Gimbutas’s idiocy to be maintained, R1b must be absent from Western Europe before the Copper Age. The reason that we see admixture from haplogroup R people in a Chinchorro woman from 4000 BC is that, as I stated for the first time early last year, haplogroup R and Indo-European languages were spread across Europe by the Gravettians during the Paleolithic, and not by Gimbutas’s mythical horse-riding Kurgan warriors from the Pontic-Caspian steppe during the Copper, Bronze, and Iron Ages.

                     BC23  BC27  BC28  BC29 Chinc Eno65    F9
Northern Amerindian 37.86 99.98 85.45 99.98 29.25 50.56 87.04
Southern Amerindian 44.32  0.00  3.42  0.00 28.30 48.54  4.12
Veddoid-Caucasoid    0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00 15.32  0.00  0.00
Northern European   13.16  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Northern Mongoloid   0.00  0.00 11.12  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Southern Mongoloid   0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  6.88
European HG          0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00 12.17  0.00  0.00
Eskimo               0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Taiwanese aborigine  3.59  0.00  0.00  0.00  6.53  0.88  0.00
Southern European    0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  8.42  0.00  0.00
Australoid           0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  1.95
Eastern Negroid      1.05  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Middle Eastern       0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Itelmen and Koryak   0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Western Negroid      0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Bushman and Pygmy    0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00

                    MA572 MA575 M1492  MOM6  AM66  AM72  AM73
Northern Amerindian 40.30 81.67 64.28 81.64 70.89 44.70 72.05
Southern Amerindian 59.68 15.88 10.16 18.34 29.09 55.29 27.93
Veddoid-Caucasoid    0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Northern European    0.00  0.00  1.99  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Northern Mongoloid   0.00  2.43  1.18  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Southern Mongoloid   0.00  0.00  7.66  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
European HG          0.00  0.00  1.87  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Eskimo               0.00  0.00 12.85  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Taiwanese aborigine  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Southern European    0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Australoid           0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Eastern Negroid      0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Middle Eastern       0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Itelmen and Koryak   0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Western Negroid      0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00
Bushman and Pygmy    0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00  0.00

ancient-america-k-16-1

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